Past events

Information about the past few years' lectures are listed below.

If you have a query about a lecture given earlier than 2013, please contact the office and they can consult the Society's archives.

2019

This guided tour, visiting the site of St Peter’s Field in Manchester city centre where the Peterloo Massacre took place, has been devised by Ed Glinert who brings his unique touch to this chilling story.

 

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The 2019 Percival Lecture will ask: ‘what does University cultural engagement in 21st century look like?’ and will be jointly delivered by two of the University’s new Cultural Institution Directors.

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It's easy to imagine that plants don’t do much because of our powerful prejudice that equates action with movement. But plants literally build themselves out of thin air and water, which is pretty extraordinary.

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In 1959 CP Snow delivered the Rede Lecture outlining his concerns about the divide between the sciences and the humanities.  His narrative and proposed solutions have parallels with today’s debates about the wider place of science in society.

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Peterloo - Two part event

A Commemoration In Words And Song and Witnesses To A Massacre

Two hundred years on from Manchester's notorious Peterloo Massacre, the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society will commemorate the victims of the Manchester Magistrates and Yeoman Cavalry's overzealous intentions to break up a peaceful gathering at St Peters Field.

 

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We are delighted to offer our members an exclusive tour of the 'Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing' exhibition at Manchester Art Gallery followed by refreshments.  The exhibition marks the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci and there are 12 of the Renaissance master's greatest drawings in the Royal collection on display.

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Off the northernmost tip of Scotland lie the Orkney Islands; it is said that if you scratch its surface Orkney bleeds archaeology. This is nowhere truer than in the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site that is renowned for some of the most iconic prehistoric monuments of Atlantic Europe.

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This year, the four Annual Section Meetings (the 4 sections being Arts, Science & Technology, Social Philosophy and Young People) will be held sequentially over a one-hour period, lasting a maximum of 15 minutes each, starting at 5.30 p.m. on 28th March.

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In this lecture Professor Bill Newman will discuss the technological advances in genomic medicine that now allow us to undertake whole genome sequencing for an individual in a time frame and at a cost that make it feasible as a test within standard healthcare.

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Magic Lanterns

Dr Jeremy Brooker

A lecture-entertainment devised by Dr. Jeremy Brooker, renowned magic lantern performer and current Chairman of the Magic Lantern Society. 

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Polio - the Rocky Road to Zero

Professor Sir Liam Donaldson

Many people think that polio is gone from the world. Only those now over 70 years old can remember the devastating paralysis it caused in childhood. The introduction of a vaccine was transformative and swept the disease out of most affluent countries of the world very quickly. Over time, the battle against the disease was won in low- and middle-income countries too.

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Almost every week a paper is published describing a new battery technology that is going to revolutionise the world and provide a step change in battery performance. Yet, this never appears to happen...but why? And can we expect the rate of improvement to change significantly? 

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Molecular Surgery with CRISPR-Cas9

Professor David Hornby
The field of Genetic Engineering was born out of fundamental research into bacterial defence mechanisms against viral infection (termed restriction and modification). During the 1970s companies such as Genentech (Genetic Engineering Technology) in Silicon Valley and Biogen in Europe began to translate these discoveries into pioneering medical applications. 

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Lindsay Anderson called Humphrey Jennings “the only true poet of the English cinema”. This lecture asks whether propaganda can be poetic through an exploration of two of Jennings’ GPO and Crown Film Unit productions from 1940 and 1942, London Can Take It and Listen to Britain...

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The programme ‘Old People's Home for 4 Year Olds’ was an experiment in which a group of children carried out their usual nursery activities in a retirement community with a group of older volunteers. The impact of such intergenerational learning often had surprising results...

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We are told that the Knowledge Economy holds the key to the future prosperity of the UK, an economy where knowledge has replaced capital, land and labour as the main resource. What does this entail? What is Manchester's approach to building a knowledge economy? Will it act a leveller for the wealth gap or widen it?

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2018

Weather forecasts are one of the great unsung triumphs of science. These predictions can even warn of impending extreme weather and this aids many areas of society, but can we go further?

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In 1992, art critic David Sylvester said “I always thought women couldn't be painters….That's just the way it has always been”. This lecture will chart the place of women in art from medieval times to the present day, considering the means by which women have emerged into the light, as artists, curators, art historians and policy makers.

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Despite past improvements in air quality, very large parts of the population in urban areas breathe air that does not meet European standards let alone the health-based World Health Organisation Air Quality Guidelines...

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Established in 1921, Universal Aunts is much the same now as it was – the calls have hardly changed through the decades; Universal Aunts still endeavours to rise to any challenge, however unusual, and the remarkable history of the company is added to every day...

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